Schlumberger Gould Research Scientist Awarded for Achievements in Oilfield Exploration Analytics Royal Chemistry Society recognizes Nathan Lawrence

Date: 10/15/2014

For Achievements in Oilfield Exploration Analytics Royal Chemistry Society

Adding to a long list of both academic and professional achievements, Nathan Lawrence, program manager and senior research scientist at the Schlumberger Gould Research (SGR) Center, UK, received the 2014 Young Industrialist of the Year Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). Each year, the RSC recognizes an individual who has made a significant contribution to industry in the early stage of his or her career. Lawrence received this year’s award for his outstanding achievement in analytical science relating to oilfield exploration.

Leadership at the Gould Research Center

In his role as a Schlumberger research scientist, Lawrence uses his knowledge of applied electrochemistry in the development of real-world chemical sensors that will ultimately be used in extreme downhole temperatures and pressures. As program manager, he is charged with guiding the chemical sensors and energy devices group in aligning technology and sensor development with the needs of Schlumberger business segments.

Multiple awards from the RSC

The 2014 award marks the third time Lawrence has been recognized by the RSC. In 2001, he received the RSC Ronald Belcher Award for graduate work in analytics at Oxford University. In 2010, he received the RSC Harrison-Meldola Prize, which is awarded for the most meritorious and promising original investigations in chemistry and the published results of those investigations.

Academic and professional achievements

Lawrence, who joined Schlumberger in 2004, completed his doctor of philosophy at the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford, England, and did post-doctoral work at New Mexico State University, USA. During his career, he has authored more than 120 research papers and a chemistry textbook. He also has more than 30 patents, one of which from Oxford University, led to the creation of a spin-out company in pH sensing.

   Nathan
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